Gov. Doug Ducey said Wednesday that the stay-at-home order put in place March 31 will be extended to May 15.

Modifications to the order promote a gradual and phased approach to reopening the state's economy.

Monday will mark a partial voluntary reopening for retail business. Guidelines call for a limited opening with appointment-based services, physical distancing, limited occupancy and curbside pick-up and delivery.

On May 8, the order opens more retail businesses. The reopenings will remain voluntary with strict physical distancing requirements and reduced occupancy.

Retail business will also be required to keep fitting rooms closed, conduct comprehensive sanitation and have options for curbside or delivery. The state still recommends vulnerable adults should stay home.

Ducey didn't include restaurants in the initial phase but said they'll release a plan next week and provide notice to the industry before reopening.

"Our goal is to do this sometime in May," he said. "We are aspirational at this time. The best-case scenario, according to the industry, would be on May 12th, but it will have to be in coordination with the industry and public health."

Bars are not under consideration for reopening, he said.

He also said a travel restrictions order would remain in place until May 15 that includes New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

Hospitals, clinics and dentists may resume elective surgeries beginning on May 1. Facilities must demonstrate an adequate capacity to continue elective surgeries.

"Today, there's 1,090 of these establishments that are eligible to resume surgeries," he said.

Ducey reported that COVID-19 patients occupy 18 to 20 percent of beds in Arizona, as well as 11 to 12 percent of ventilators. Both averages have remained steady.

Ducey responded to a question that some businesses reported they plan to reopen Friday morning regardless of the order's extension by saying the state would use fines to enforce the law if necessary.

He said compliance might not have been 100 percent so far, but most businesses have listened to the order.

However, he cautioned against businesses refusing to continue cooperating through the May 15 extension.

"If that's not there, this is an order that is enforceable by law," Ducey said. "A violation is a $2,500 fine and up to six months in jail. And for those that own an establishment and are publicly going to flaunt the order, you are playing with your liquor license. Don't do that."

Jorge Encinas | 520-547-9732