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After a gunman killed six worshippers at a Sikh temple in 2012, Gurinder Singh Basra knew he needed to do something to fight deadly stereotypes about his faith. Sikhs, who believe in equality for all and service to others, increasingly had become the targets of hate crimes after September 11…

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In Japan, one company is taking paper thinner than it’s ever been before. Hidaka Washi Ltd. creates paper as thin as human skin, using methods that date back a thousand years. The paper is then sent to museums and libraries around the world—including the British Museum and the Library of Con…

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Falconry thrills Lauren McGough. She’s practiced the ancient tradition since she the age of 14 and is one of the very few American women to do so. Her love of falconry has taken her all the way to Mongolia, where she studied with Kazakh eagle hunters, and earned her a Fulbright fellowship an…

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Tree says Terrell can call him anytime—and he means it. The two met playing on a Los Angeles softball league created to promote peace and stop deadly infighting between factions of Crips. Tree’s taken Terrell under his wing, and Terrell sees Tree like an older brother. The bond is so real, t…

Electric cars may seem like a contemporary, eco-friendly concept, but did you know they made a brief appearance in 19th-century New York City? Back in 1895, hundreds of electric taxis called “Electrobats” cruised the streets of Midtown Manhattan. They had a charging station on Broadway and, …

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When basketball courts end up with cracks, dips and divots, Dan Peterson and company step in. With the help of artists and community volunteers, Project Backboard resurfaces public courts and turns them into fly, large-scale pieces of art. The organization has brought new life and sleek aest…

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How should men prepare for fatherhood? One organization seems to have the answers. Welcome to Boot Camp for New Dads, where men learn how to own their new role as fathers. Here, soon-to-be dads get a crash course in everything from changing diapers to feeding and burping. Veteran dads serve …

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The data used in the analysis is from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2017 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates. For each city, the percent of workers that traveled less than 10 minutes to work each way (out of all workers who do not work at home) was determined. The resulting statistic was used to rank cities. Only the largest 100 cities by population were included in the analysis.

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The One Love Machine band are a scrappy crew. They have an affinity for punk rock, and members of the band play the bass, drums and flute. Oh, and they’re all robots. The band is made up of scrap metal animatronics, created from salvaged junk from scrapyards around Berlin. For creator of the…

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Located just outside of Rovaniemi City is Kotisaari, one of Finland’s tiniest islands. Measuring only 820 feet long and 200 feet wide, this sleepy locale used to be a center point for loggers in the area. The picturesque island is surrounded by a river that was once used as a floating channe…

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The data used in this analysis is from the U.S. Census Bureau 2017 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates. Mean weekly commuting time for each city was derived from its mean one-way commuting time assuming two trips per day done five days per week. The total weekly working/commuting time is the sum of working time and commuting time. Cities were ordered by this combined total. In the event of a tie, working time was used to order cities. Only cities with times exceeding 46 hours per week were included in the final list.

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Across the major cities in the U.S., the total time people spend working and commuting each week ranges from a low of 34.7 hours in Provo, Utah to a high of almost 47 hours in Walnut Creek, California. The national average is 43.3 hours per week (38.8 working hours and 4.5 commuting hours), according to data from the 2017 American Community Survey.